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The Fault in Our StarsScreen shot 2014-02-21 at 1.23.00 PM

By John Green

John Green’s New York Times-best-selling book tells about the entwined love story of Hazel Lancaster and Augustus Waters. Hazel has thyroid cancer, and Augustus is in remission from losing his leg to osteosarcoma, which puts a fascinating plot line in place.

Hazel and Augustus meet at a support group for kids with cancer, and Augustus accompanies his friend Isaac. Immediately afterwards, they go to watch a movie at Augustus’ house, and they click right then and there.

One of the main things they bond over is books. Hazel makes Augustus read An Imperial Affliction, and in turn Hazel reads the Price of Dawn, the novelization of Augustus’s favorite video game. After reading it, Augustus says, “Tell me my copy is missing the last twenty pages or something. Hazel Grace, tell me I have not reached the end of this book.” So Augustus uses the “Make-a-Wish” he saved to fly them to Amsterdam to meet the author, who, in an ironic twist of plot turns out to be a drunk.

I personally enjoyed the way this book was written, unique in its own special kind of way. The plot line was also perfectly planned out and could not have been more perfect for the book.  I could not stand to put it down for a second. Hazel & Augustus captured my heart from the moment I opened the book. The Fault in Our Stars  is a must-read for any teen reader or adult. You will want to read it all in one sitting.

~LitKid

postscript from AKid@Heart: As LitKid gets older, she’s tackling books about bigger issues. My policy all along has been do almost no editing of her reviews, unless something is truly hard to follow/understand.

When I got to this sentence of the “Fault in Our Stars” review: 

“So Augustus uses the “Make-a-Wish” he saved to fly them to Amsterdam to meet the author, who, in an ironic twist of plot turns out to be a drunk.”

… I was a little taken aback! But it occurred to me that “Lost in a Book” is entering a whole new era of book reviewing as she enters a new era of reading, and my policy will remain the same; I hope you enjoy seeing her perspective evolve as much as I will! 

(She read TFIOS as part of a middle school bookclub, and the bookclub leaders later said that they realized too late that it was probably better for older kids.) 

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